Sermon: On being a good guest

By Joanna Lawrence Shenk and Pat Plude

Luke 14:15-24

I want to bring your attention to our prayer of confession, written for this series. Especially the second and third lines: We offer what we can at our welcome table. We become guests at the welcome table of others.

So far in the series we’ve been talking about our welcome table and its limits. Today I’m going to focus on why it’s important to be guests at the welcome table of others and how that relates to power. 

I want to begin with a story that takes place a few years back. The setting is a capoeira weekend conference/festival I attended with my dear friend, Sarah. Sarah had been practicing capoeira for a couple years and she was eager for me to get to know that community too. 

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Sermon: Class and the Welcome Table

This is the second sermon in our “Back to the Basics” series on “Who’s Got a Place at the Welcome Table?”

Psalm 62: 5-12

Ben Bolaños’ story:  

Fremont, Ohio. 1985-86.

There are moments in your life where time slows down.  A snapshot of an event imprinted in successive images.  Do you know what I mean?  Here’s mine.  Image — A 13 year old Latino boy, holding a short dowel connected to a roll of thick, coarse string and standing in a row of tomato plants, slumped over as if fatigued. Image — Bending down and tautly tying the string across rows of lonely wooden poles supporting the plants.  Over and over.  Image — looking up to the sun glaring down.  Hot. Thirsty. Time? Don’t know.  Imag — Hands, calloused, pain, back. pain.  Image — He looks over and sees the head migrant worker telling him to redo that row.  “!Oye, mas apretado!” (tighter)  Image — Hand gently pressed on shoulder. “Mijo, we don’t get paid for loose string. Me entiendes?” (you understand me).  “Si Tony. Perdon” (Yes, Tony. sorry). 

That was me, the boy. I was introduced to hard work and a simple faith by Tony, a migrant worker and devout Christian, loyal and steadfast.  He was part of my father’s church, and my father adored him so much that he entrusted Tony to take me under his wings and work the way the poor always have — with their hands, bound to an unyielding faith to a God that provides and heals.  There was no choice.  A simple faith. My parents? Educated. One trained as a sociologist, the other a theologian.  I was middle class, or so I thought.   For myself, I was stuck between the poor, the simple and the complicated.  In others words,  I did not belong to either.  I could not fully relate to my migrant friends nor was I entirely accepted  in the white academic culture of school. Image — A poor white girl walks up to me and coolly says, “Your lips are big. You’re a N———.” Image — I laugh at her stupidity. I was better than her..

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Sermon: Who’s Got a Place at the Welcome Table?

This is the first sermon in our Back to the Basics series entitled “Who’s Got a Place at the Welcome Table?” The image is “The Trinity” or “The Hospitality of Abraham,” an icon created by Russian painter Andrei Rublev in the 15th century.

So many people contributed to the ideas in this sermon: Many of them are named, but some of them aren’t – so I want to also thank Joanna Shenk, Pat Plude and planning committee member Ben Bolaños as additional contributors to the ideas in this sermon.

Shalom Mennonite Church in Tucson is one of our sibling congregations in Pacific Southwest Mennonite Conference. Becca Cordes, whom some of you know, is now an active member there, and Tina Schlabach, their co-pastor, did a trauma training here a few years back. I also work closely with their other co-pastor, Carol Rose, on the Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery Coalition. Shalom fascinates me because, recently, in the space of about one year, they went from being a largely middle-class white Mennonite congregation to being a multi-class, multicultural, multi-racial, multi-lingual church.

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